DO you know NASA's Hubble Accidentally Discovers Dwarf Galaxy 30 Million Light Years Away Trending Information Trending Information

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

DO you know NASA's Hubble Accidentally Discovers Dwarf Galaxy 30 Million Light Years Away


This is a Hubble Space Telescope image of a concentration of stars within the globular cluster NGC 6752. Hidden among the stars is an image of a background galaxy that is much farther away. The diminutive galaxy, named by its discoverers as Bedin 1, measures only around 3,000 light-years at its greatest extent — a fraction of the size of the Milky Way. Not only is it tiny, but it is also incredibly faint. These properties led astronomers to classify it as a dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is as old as the universe. Credit: NASA, ESA and L. Bedin (Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy)
This is a Hubble Space Telescope image of a concentration of stars within the globular cluster NGC 6752. Hidden among the stars is an image of a background galaxy that is much farther away. The diminutive galaxy, named by its discoverers as Bedin 1, measures only around 3,000 light-years at its greatest extent — a fraction of the size of the Milky Way. Not only is it tiny, but it is also incredibly faint. These properties led astronomers to classify it as a dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is as old as the universe. Credit: NASA, ESA and L. Bedin (Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy)
  • NASA scientists have discovered a dwarf galaxy in a globular cluster which is only 30 million light years away. 
  • The team used the NASA/ ESA (European Space Agency) telescope to study white dwarf stars within the globular cluster NGC 6752.
  • The newly discovered cosmic neighbor, nicknamed Bedin 1 by the astronomers, is a modestly sized, elongated galaxy, the study said.
  • It measures only around 3, 000 light-years at its greatest extent - a fraction of the size of the Milky Way. Not only is it tiny, but it is also incredible.
  • These properties led astronomers to classify it as a dwarf spheroidal galaxy
  • Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are defined by their small size, low-luminosity, lack of dust and old stellar populations. 
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This is a Hubble Space Telescope image of a concentration of stars within the globular cluster NGC 6752. Hidden among the stars is an image of a background galaxy that is much farther away. The diminutive galaxy, named by its discoverers as Bedin 1, measures only around 3,000 light-years at its greatest extent — a fraction of the size of the Milky Way. Not only is it tiny, but it is also incredibly faint. These properties led astronomers to classify it as a dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is as old as the universe. Credit: NASA, ESA and L. Bedin (Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy)
This is a Hubble Space Telescope image of a concentration of stars within the globular cluster NGC 6752. Hidden among the stars is an image of a background galaxy that is much farther away. The diminutive galaxy, named by its discoverers as Bedin 1, measures only around 3,000 light-years at its greatest extent — a fraction of the size of the Milky Way. Not only is it tiny, but it is also incredibly faint. These properties led astronomers to classify it as a dwarf spheroidal galaxy that is as old as the universe. Credit: NASA, ESA and L. Bedin (Astronomical Observatory of Padua, Italy)



According to a NASA statement...
"scientists stumbled upon stars in the cluster's outer fringes that did not actually belong. The stars were actually much farther away and part of the dwarf spheroidal galaxy dubbed Bedin 1".
  • The telescope also found the NGC 1466, an ancient, glimmering star cluster with an age of around 13.1 billion years old.
  • NGC 1466 is a gathering of stars all held together by gravity, otherwise known as a globular cluster
According to NASA's website...
  • The cluster is slowly moving in the cosmos on the fringers of one of Milky Way's neighboring galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • The universe is very cluttered. Myriad island cities of stars, the galaxies, form a backdrop tapestry. Much closer to home are nebulae, star clusters, and assorted other foreground celestial objects that are mostly within our Milky Way galaxy. Despite the vastness of space, objects tend to get in front of each other.
  • This happened when astronomers used the Hubble Space Telescope to photograph the globular star cluster NGC 6752 (located 13,000 light-years away in our Milky Way's halo). 
  • In a celestial game of "Where's Waldo?" Hubble's sharp vision uncovered a never-before-seen dwarf galaxy located far behind the cluster's crowded stellar population. 
  • The loner galaxy is in our own cosmic backyard, only 30 million light-years away (approximately 2,300 times farther than the foreground cluster).


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